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values

How a team player helps foster their company's values

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How a team player helps foster their company's values

You know your values now and you've found an organization with the ideals to complement yours. How are you going to help your team foster them and create your own valuable space? First, consider the team’s values. Keep in mind that every workplace, while putting their own unique trademark on the concepts, is going to want to embody in some way the traits of integrity, accountability, diligence, perseverance, and discipline.

So let’s discuss how to embrace these qualities in employees as well as how to help foster them in coworkers - in three easy steps each!

Integrity -

  1. Be trustworthy - in your work and errors, and in your confidences among coworkers.
  2. Don’t be negative about colleagues or the workspace.
  3. Hold yourself to just as high - or even higher - a standard as you do everyone else.

Accountability -

  1. Be responsible for your relationships.
  2. Seek conflict solutions and understand the part you may play.
  3. Choose your behaviors so that they promote unity and not divisiveness.

Diligence -

  1. Ask questions when you need to.
  2. Embrace deadlines and work toward them at pace.
  3. Follow-up when your inquiries aren’t responded to in a timely fashion.

Perseverance -

  1. Find ways to solve the unsolvable - or at worst, come up with an alternative.
  2. Don’t put projects to the side. Always keep working on it even if priorities have to be shuffled.
  3. If the workload is too much, enlist help.

Discipline -

  1. At all times keep in mind your end goals - on your project, in your career.
  2. Step away if the stress becomes too much.
  3. Set a schedule and keep it.

Your values will guide your workplace performance. By embodying these traits, you’ll set an example for the rest of the team as well as stay on your own track for success. Remember that the workplace is diverse and multi-generational, so there are often disagreements and miscommunications, but focusing on these five traits and how to develop them within yourself will keep conflicts to a minimum and strengthen your team.

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A Selection of Some of My Favorite Company Values

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A Selection of Some of My Favorite Company Values

There are Five Key Values any strong organization demonstrates in one way or another and will want to see in its candidates:

Integrity. From white lies to great risks, it’s better to be honest from the start. Don’t pad the resume and be forthcoming about your needs and skills. Your record will demonstrate your honesty and your employers will appreciate it.

Accountability. It runs parallel to integrity - do you take responsibility for your actions no matter the consequence? The answer should be yes - someone who is willing to be responsible for potential errors will make fewer in the first place.

Diligence. This is all about accuracy and paper trails and it can be boring and stressful - if you’re doing it completely wrong. We don’t need more forms, we need more practice to create strong, reliable products and concepts. It’s quality improvement, not mindless boredom and labor.

Perseverance. Now this is an easy one in a business, but it’s a hard one to practice in personal life - tired of repeating the same mistakes? Toss it and forget it! That’s how we handle at-home projects, but we can’t do that in business. We tinker until it’s ready for market. Show potential employers that you can stick out a difficult situation.

Discipline. This doesn’t look the same everywhere. A reporter’s discipline will be an ability to adapt, multitask, and think on their feet. An office administrator’s discipline will be skill in establishing and maintaining routines. Are you disciplined? Does your discipline match the organization’s?

Once you’ve identified your own values, you’ll be able to find the right organizations to help you flourish as a professional. The company’s values will match or at least coincide with your own. In order to make yourself attractive to the best companies who align with your core beliefs, establish yourself as someone who carries themselves with the Five Key Values. You’ll be a stand-out candidate and a stronger professional for it.

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TR Weekly Roundtable

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TR Weekly Roundtable

This week we talked about how to identify our core values and find the right organizational fit for our values. Christine had this to say about it:

The blog post mentions grabbing a piece of paper and spending 10 minutes identifying your values. It’s a small doing, but I think there’s a lot to be said. For me, a few of my own values consist of giving my 110% every single day at work, clocking in on time, and owning up to my mistakes. I know this is what drives me, and makes me feel good as a person. When I write it down, it helps me focus on what’s important and helps re-affirm what matters to me. I don’t always give it my 110% at work, nor do I find it easy to admit to my boss when I’ve made a mistake. However, because I know these are my core values, I work that much harder to make sure I hit those core values the next time around.

As recruiters we have to practice what we preach, and we work hard to stay true to our own values so we can help our candidates find the right fit for theirs, and our clients define their values and bring in matching applicants. 

Thanks for checking in with us! Next week we'll discuss three daily practices to elevate internal recruiting practices - recruiters won't want to miss that!

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Define your values and find your purpose

Define your values and find your purpose

You can tell a lot about an organization by their values. The best matches are made when values align. If you are career searching, and are looking for meaningful work, there is no better place to start than by identifying your core values. Would you rather deliver exceptional work or is it more important to reach the project deadline? While a simple statement, it can radically change your employment experience from one that feels good to an everyday battle. Life is better when your personal values mesh with your company’s. If you value self-actualization, you might not fit into a traditionalist company. If you value fun, a team who focuses on rigor and long hours won’t be your dream position. Fear not if you don’t find a 100% match but rather a fierce complement; the strongest teams are built on diversity. Each unique mindset brings different experience. Abl Schools intentionally seeks a wide range of diverse backgrounds to make sure multiple viewpoints are represented in the product.  

To identify your values, grab a piece of paper and 10 minutes of time. What makes you happiest? What “drives” your work? How do you hit your “flow”? What work and personal accomplishments are you the most proud of? How are you most satisfied? For each of these questions, identify in both your career and personal life what you are doing and who you are with when you experience them. What other factors are present? If your proudest moment wasn’t the time you received some amazing award for a project you poured sweat equity into, and instead it was the recognition your team received for a small project everyone worked together on, guess what - you’ve just identified a key value. Perhaps teamwork matters to you over competitiveness or being the best.

Try to identify 5-10 core values in no particular order, combining any that go together easily (independence and fun could be adventurousness!). Now prioritize them. Focus on your first two. In choosing between challenge and support for example, would you go your own to do something no one else has ever accomplished, or would you seek stability in smaller challenges that keep you close to your network? Compare each one until you have them in a priority order.Do the highest values make you proud? Would you stand by them even if you were in the minority? You’ve found them if the answers to both questions are “yes.” Adjust as necessary.

Your first four or five values are the ones you’re going to want to prioritize in looking for a good organizational fit. Different companies will look slightly different with the same values, and similar companies may choose different values. You can also read a lot into a company based on how they present their values. Dropbox has five values, mostly centered on teamwork and work quality, but the fifth is a picture of a cupcake. Everyone loves cupcakes - but what does it mean? It represents a fun office. This is so unique - we all love cupcakes and who doesn’t want fun - but just the graphic instead of words is indicate of how outside the box Dropbox thinks. That’s a very informal and super-creative atmosphere. You should know immediately from the way they speak whether you’d fit in there or not. At Thumbtack, a platform that builds local economies by connecting locals with tasks to complete with professionals seeking clients, one value is “Go!” and two others are “[k]now our customer” “[m]ake each other better.”

Now that you’ve identified your core values, you’ll have a clearer sense of your direction and at which companies you truly belong and can provide value to - and don’t forget, you want a good match because the right company builds you as much as you build their product.